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Shepherding

I had the privilege of preaching on Sunday. The gospel was from John where Jesus asks Peter three times, "Do you love me more than these?" He then charges him to feed my lambs etc. On the heels of that, Sunday night we got word that our pastor was resigning and taking a call in CT. Then Mon. morning I read this post, written by Henri Nouwen which seems so timely.

Laying Down Your Life for Your Friends

Good Shepherds are willing to lay down their lives for their sheep (see John 10:11). As spiritual leaders walking in the footsteps of Jesus, we are called to lay down our lives for our people. This laying down might in special circumstances mean dying for others. But it means first of all making our own lives - our sorrows and joys, our despair and hope, our loneliness and experience of intimacy - available to others as sources of new life.

One of the greatest gifts we can give others is ourselves. We offer consolation and comfort, especially in moments of crisis, when we say: "Do not be afraid, I know what you are living and I am living it with you. You are not alone." Thus we become Christ-like shepherds.



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