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Healing Rain of Tears

Sunday, we had healing services at both St. Timothy Lutheran Church and at  St. Mark Lutheran Church in Mayville. It is a part of our liturgy which I always enjoy. We do this whenever there's a fifth Sunday.

A few came forward at St. Timothy and it was a significant time for folks whether they came forward or remained in their seats. When we began this part of the service at St. Mark, nearly everyone that I laid hands on threw there arms around me and many said that they needed to pray for me. They had tears in their eyes. The Holy Spirit fell and visited us in such a special way. Nearly everyone came forward for prayer and God's presence was with us in such a sweet way.

Reflecting back on that time, the words of Michael W. Smith's song, Healing Rain came to mind. Along with that there was the thought that the tears that were shed on Sunday were God's healing rain of tears. Here is the You Tube of Healing Rain.

I am asking for your prayers as well. I have four bulging discs in my back which are on nerves. Walking and standing aggrevate the situation and then my feet become completely numb and feel like concrete. Physical therapy hasn't helped. Injections haven't helped. Friday morning I am seeing a back surgeon. Thanks for praying.

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